Tag Archives: Wallace Stevens

To find

Looking back at Clark’s article on Picasso and Modern British Art, about the Stedelijk still life he says “Picasso’s colouring and cross-hatching are infinitely more nervous and ad hoc than they look from ten feet away.” It’s the ad hocness … Continue reading

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Things as they are

I’d like to return to a piece by Elizabeth Murray included in an earlier post, because it demonstrates something important about American art. The right hand part has three zig-zags and one curve, the left hand part has three curves … Continue reading

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The Wall

I want to be clear that the inhuman does not mean geometry, which in fact is all too human. The concept is not idealist and has nothing to do with ideas of “purity,” such as pure abstraction or pure form, … Continue reading

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All Too Human

The concept of the “inhuman” can’t be taken too literally. Unlike some science fiction dreamers, I don’t advocate that people should become inhuman, more than human or part machine. I don’t see how an artist can be anything other than … Continue reading

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Off the coast

Following from the previous post, the word “critique,” is very problematic. I doubt if anyone in the art world has any real idea what it means. It’s doubly difficult in that whoever thinks there is a stable meaning automatically misses … Continue reading

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Art and thought

A recent article by T.J.Clark in the LRB is quite good. It’s mostly about the inadequacy of British art, a topic worth returning to. Discussing the amazing Three Dancers in the Tate he notices Picasso’s “power of mind.” This is … Continue reading

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