Tag Archives: sculpture

Katherine Gili

This 1974 work by Katherine Gili seems to meet many of the demands of the new English metal sculpture school, as laid out by Robin Greenwoood in his critique of Caro. It is planar, but has more than one flat … Continue reading

Posted in Abstract Sculpture, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Table Pieces

Anthony Caro’s Table Pieces are really great, and as far as I can see they are all great, and there are literally hundreds.

Posted in Abstract Sculpture, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Drawing in Space

“Drawing in space” is a very important technical development in modern sculpture. Shep Steiner’s study of David Smith’s Hudson River Landscape, and other works, which he kindly let me read, is, as usual, brilliant, and opened up this topic for … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Anthony Caro

Just heard the news about the death of Anthony Caro. Although he’s been less on the critical radar in recent years, he was truly a great artist. My feeling about his work was always that it was light, and clearly … Continue reading

Posted in Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Judd’s Polarities

I’ve been reading David Raskin’s book on Donald Judd, and it is kind of remarkable, not least because Raskin does not pretend to the objectivity of the art historian, but clearly and openly takes a position on and with his … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Love Letters

I’ve been enjoying a group of small works in Stella’s Kleist series named after some of the writer’s love letters. Each one has a nice formal gesture; this piece, for example, has parts that swing up and down in opposite … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Is Painting Dead? Or Sculpture?

The preceding post weighed in with a few tons of metal—maybe too much of Stella’s sculpture all at once. But the ideas are not new to this blog. I’ve already mentioned Stephen Melville’s argument that sculpture has been liquidated between … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Moving Out and Staying Back

I’m still getting great enjoyment out of Frank Stella’s Moby Dick series, which seems to be a kind of culmination. With the next series, built around the writings of Kleist, he gives up the method of constructing in superimposed planes … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sculpture and Painting

It’s now widely accepted that Donald Judd’s work contains many illusionistic effects, and some that could be described as painterly—transparent color, colored shadows, reflections and so on. This recognition should pave the way for the arguments I’ve been making in … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Gedi Sibony

The opticality of sculpture is a problem that won’t go away, and it has everything to do with the viability of painting. When Judd said that he wanted to make an art that was neither painting nor sculpture, I doubt … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment