Tag Archives: scale

Size and Importance

Further on from the previous post—if Stella was part of a larger, more general response to abstract expressionism, I think the generally accepted understanding of that response has been too limited. We usually hear that it was a reaction against the … Continue reading

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Bigger and Better

In some quarters one hears the claim that bigger means more serious or more ambitious. Not necessarily, because bigger doesn’t necessarily mean more. It’s one way to get attention in the world, and maybe does indicate a desire to get … Continue reading

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Picasso

There’s a Picasso show in Toronto right now, which I just saw for the second time. The famous gynomorphic still life, reproduced everywhere, is three to four times bigger than I expected. Big hacking strokes with a wide brush. Now there’s … Continue reading

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Vividness

It might be possible to propose a theory as to why modern art, in its later stage, has been preoccupied with scale and shape. Reduction of elements and simplification of form has the effect of making what is left more … Continue reading

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The scale of the imagination

Further to the discussion of scale: in historic art the brushstroke was scaled to the figure or object represented. That makes total sense—small strokes for small figures, big ones for larger. To scale the brushstroke to the size of the … Continue reading

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Scale and Composition

Shep Steiner’s recent comment affirms that T.J.Clark’s recent LRB article on Picasso and British art is worth reading. What Clark is responding to is Picasso’s skill at scaling the image to the size of the canvas, something that all great … Continue reading

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