Tag Archives: Robert Hullot-Kentor

Inwardness of a Work

What is inwardness anyway? It exists, and it matters, but it’s not really “in” anything. I used to think that commentary expanded as the art work diminished, but now disapprove of such off-hand criticism. Kitaj is right, commentary may not … Continue reading

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Inwardness

In the Brooklyn Rail conversation mentioned earlier, Robert Hullot-Kentor offers the following observation: “…academics included, the U.S. verges on homogeneity in its denial of psychological reality. Hardly anyone wants to know what goes on inside themselves. There is strikingly little … Continue reading

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What We Are

Jennifer McMackon drew my attention to a conversation with Bob Hullot-Kentor in the Brooklyn Rail, from which I take this quote: “…in the Christian view, which includes Hegel’s triune concept, the highest becomes the lowest so that the lowest can … Continue reading

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