Tag Archives: R.H.Quaytman

A Literary Art

Back at the start of this blog, in 2011 I think it was, I wrote several posts on R.H.Quaytman. She’s still one of my favourite artists, and features prominently in my book. Another artist with a very creative relationship to … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Large Forms

Following from the previous post, some thoughts from Ehrenzweig suggest what might be interesting about an abstract book: “…integration [of the artwork] can only be controlled by the empty stare of unconscious scanning which alone is capable of overcoming the … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Painting Off

Today one often hears painters whine about the supposed marginal status of their favorite medium in the art world. In 1991 Stella offered the following words of comfort: “Because we accept so readily the idea of the manageable whole or … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Inventors of forms

Why abstraction has to be literary in some sense, is, as Stella has also pointed out, because otherwise it may not have enough of the meanings that we care about, that it may be thin, shallow and dessicated. As Wallace … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vividness

It might be possible to propose a theory as to why modern art, in its later stage, has been preoccupied with scale and shape. Reduction of elements and simplification of form has the effect of making what is left more … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

So far

This blog is getting complex, and though I’m glad to be getting comments on older posts I’m also afraid that some good moments will be lost because of the very nature of a blog, which is that it is always … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Context as Backstory

As David Court pointed out in his recent comment, what used to be backstory has been turned inside out and become context, or analysis of context. At least that is the normative history of the turn from an emptied out … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A literary measure

I’d like to answer the question I asked about Motherwell’s work a few posts back by suggesting that it fails for both reasons; the Elegies series is both too literary and not literary enough. The works are too literary because … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Inwardness projected

As I discussed in the posts about R.H.Quaytman, inside and outside are arbitrary distinctions, and it is this fact which is responsible for the skepticism about the self exhibited by the more sophisticated members of the art world. Perhaps art … Continue reading

Posted in Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quaytman’s Book

The other great merit of the chapter as an organizing form is that it can’t stand alone. There have been previous chapters and there will be later ones, each of which will force us to read it differently. (Admitting that … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Inside and Out

I think that Quaytman’s critic is right to stress a dialectic of inside and out, and it’s reasonable to ground it in the distinction between art and institutional critique, but I think it’s also important to dwell on the form. … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Literary Forms of Abstraction

Which is more fundamental, visual experience or the forms of abstraction? As discussed in the previous post, form does not necessarily mean shapes in a picture, rather I’m talking about the form of the tableau, the form of the open … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quaytman’s poem

Presumably one reads a Quaytman installation like a book, from left to right, but it operates by comparison between any two components. Like a poem. Installation poems allow the “reader” to move in any direction. I think that Quaytman’s poems … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quaytman’s novel

R.H.Quaytman is making a continuous work in sections that she calls “chapters,” each of which is one show. Individual panels are then paragraphs or sentences. The whole thing is a narrative in pictures, and since many of the panels don’t … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What’s new?

Looking at the images I’ve posted so far, it may seem that I have pretty fusty ideas about what constitutes a “new” abstraction. Just to assure my gentle readers that I do have current interests, future posts will have something … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment