Tag Archives: prints

Repeating Patterns

As in all improvisation, patterns tend to recur. In fact, the more open and free the improv, the more subject it is to repetition. This is something I’ve learned from music, and this is why preparation helps a lot. Art … Continue reading

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Abstract Order

Following on from the previous post, Stella’s manner in the late prints especially, but also in many of his reliefs, is to be vivid, crazy, overloaded and loud. That’s what puts a lot of viewers off. It’s a style and … Continue reading

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Had Gadya Again

Just for the pleasure of it I want to make another Stella print/study comparison. The Had Gadya works reward the effort. From the first resolved version of this piece to the final, the scribbly bits are quite changed. The scribbles … Continue reading

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Rorshach Fail

Stella, at least before Moby Dick, was pretty committed to non-representational art, and kept coming up with new ways to see what that meant. Here’s another quote from the catalog mentioned earlier:“The way I see it, an abstract painting should … Continue reading

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Had Gadya

Still on the topic of Stella’s prints, my new catalog documents three of the Had Gadya pieces from original collage to an interim state. In all of them the first version seems, to my eyes, to have a clearer structure, … Continue reading

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Stella’s Prints

I just got hold of a very interesting Stella catalog, called Fourteen Prints with Drawings, Collages and Working Proofs. The interview is hilarious and brilliant. Here’s a few choice remarks: When the Black prints came out, many people dismissed them: … Continue reading

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Woodcuts

Still dwelling on the Sydney Paths to Abstraction catalog, which I find surprisingly inspiring. Surprising because many of the works have never been among my favorites. But there are two great merits to this show and catalog – the prominent … Continue reading

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In Memoriam

The series Polar Coordinates for Ronnie Peterson was another tough one for me to learn to like, but now I love them. Somehow, the two layer structure, combined with the busyness of the “ground” layer, has some relevance to the … Continue reading

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Stella’s Prints

I’ve been enjoying Stella’s prints, and discovering one series after another. Usually each new one is a challenge. I have the catalogue raisonné of the prints up to 1982, and look at it with pleasure every day. And the prints … Continue reading

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Laura Owens

The recent Artforum interview with Laura Owens is very interesting. Her new paintings are good, and in fact resemble Stella’s work in concrete ways. She has an inclusive approach to technique, is involved with printmaking, uses illusionistic shadows and frames … Continue reading

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Hofmann

Stella is on record as a huge admirer of Hans Hofmann, so the resemblance of this early print to the Moby Dick works should not be surprising. This Hofmann is imaginatively and pictorially more substantial than, say, a typical ink … Continue reading

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