Tag Archives: Lucio Fontana

Those Who Wait

The theme of waiting deserves a few posts. I originally thought I could make one, or even two, but it’s too rich of a topic. What is Fontana waiting for? His slashes are titled “Attesa,” which I would translate as … Continue reading

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The Model

Ehrenzweig on life drawing: “In schools the nudity of the model must not be associated with an individual person. The art student rises above any emotional involvement with the nude woman as a person; he [sic] is encouraged to study … Continue reading

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Alexis Harding

One of my favorite contemporaries is Alexis Harding, an old friend. I think he uses gravity in a very good way, with a lot of intervention on the way down. He pours a grid of commercial enamel over artist’s oils, … Continue reading

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Abstract Allegories

Imagery in abstract pictures is often allegorical. It doesn’t have to be. The interest of the works of someone like Howard Hodgkin, for example, is that they represent specific matter—a portrait of a particular person, a certain place and time. … Continue reading

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Fontana

Impeccable vulgarity.

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Persistence of desire

Reduction in Fontana means eroticism without any idealization, a base genital sexuality. Just the facts and the elemental drive, which presumably has its own reasons and rhythms. But the following quote gives another perspective: “The final stage (the stage that … Continue reading

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Formalism, conceptualism and the death of desire

At the conclusion of Thomas Hardy’s novel The Well-Beloved, the hero, a successful sculptor of the Alfred Gilbert type, loses all interest in art in his later years: “On another afternoon they went to the National Gallery, to test his … Continue reading

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Pre-conceptualism

It’s hard to know exactly what people get from art; certainly their own testimony has to be taken with skepticism. But I’m contemplating the view that aesthetic pleasures, sensations, satisfactions, feelings—whatever they might be called, however they might be characterized—are … Continue reading

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