Tag Archives: landscape

Watching Landscape

Another one of Pollock’s remarks is a real eye opener for me, a lesson: “I don’t look at the view, I watch it. The land is alive, tells you things when you let it.” Very interesting, and inspiring.

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The Creator Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley describes her own position in these terms:“For the last fifty years, it has been my belief that as a modern artist you should make a contribution to the art of your time, if only a small one. When … Continue reading

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Figure and Landscape

To return to a topic discussed earlier, I mentioned the pastels of Degas, in which he transformed a nude into a landscape—or vice versa. In any case what we have is a work, and we can take it or leave … Continue reading

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Landscape Contra Figure

The view that abstract art derives from landscape is venerable, and if we look at Kandinsky, Mondrian and other early abstractionists, not far-fetched. Ehrenzweig makes the following observation: “In my view, the dehumanization of Western art began when the contemplation … Continue reading

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Figures in a Landscape

Many of my works are figures, and many are landscapes. Since the overall rubric is “Islands,” I guess they are really all figures in a landscape. The figure might be found in the negative space or ocean, so figure and … Continue reading

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An abstract landscape

“Among the beds without flowers and the chipped cupids, the gnawing of actuality seemed for the moment silenced. In this place which had been left without meaning it seemed easier to feel meaning where there was perhaps none.” Anthony Powell

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