Tag Archives: Donald Judd

Size and Importance

Further on from the previous post—if Stella was part of a larger, more general response to abstract expressionism, I think the generally accepted understanding of that response has been too limited. We usually hear that it was a reaction against the … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Object Matter

From William Tucker’s book The Language of Sculpture, comes these further words on cubist construction: “Apart from their richness and power as individual pieces, all these wooden constructions demonstrate the object-nature of modern sculpture. They take objects, still-life, as their … Continue reading

Posted in Abstract Sculpture, American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Early Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Heaving Space

The following words from Ehrenzweig approximate very closely Andreas Neufert‘s thesis that Pollock’s gestures mimic the eye movements stimulated by cubism: “Cubism went out of its way to deny the eye stable focusing points round which the rest of the … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Judd’s Polarities

I’ve been reading David Raskin’s book on Donald Judd, and it is kind of remarkable, not least because Raskin does not pretend to the objectivity of the art historian, but clearly and openly takes a position on and with his … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Complexity and Simplification

Throughout the twentieth century, the formal complexities of modernist art have driven artists to simplify and clarify their work. Judd and the other minimalists were doubtless right in their feeling that abstract painting had become too fiddly and fussy about … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Time and Space

Spent an enjoyable afternoon with Josh Thorpe, an excellent artist with very good ideas about the relative value of experience and theory.  He recently published a guide book to Dan Graham’s pavilions, which also contains an interview with the artist. … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lines in Space

A little while ago I received the following note from Richard Shiff, referring to an earlier post: “I agree with these lines of yours, with regard to Judd … ‘I think that an artist like Judd would probably assent, but … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Newtonian Abstraction

In the Newtonian system there is a stable framework within which all bodies can be placed, an absolute space, an empty box that extends in all directions. Newton himself understood this as a simplification, and it is viewed by scientists … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, American Modernism, Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sculpture and Painting

It’s now widely accepted that Donald Judd’s work contains many illusionistic effects, and some that could be described as painterly—transparent color, colored shadows, reflections and so on. This recognition should pave the way for the arguments I’ve been making in … Continue reading

Posted in American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment