Tag Archives: death

Failure

A recent article in the NYT by Stephen Marche makes the case for failure, although he’s talking about writers not artists. He mentions how business, particularly the Silicon Valley variety, has taken up Samuel Beckett’s phrase “fail better,” but with … Continue reading

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Feelings for and of the World

Following from the previous post, landscapes are beautiful to the extent that our feelings live there, and I love landscape and landscape art. But the art that is willing to die is closer to the body—not just content to look … Continue reading

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The Creator Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley describes her own position in these terms:“For the last fifty years, it has been my belief that as a modern artist you should make a contribution to the art of your time, if only a small one. When … Continue reading

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Philosophy of an Artist II

From a recent interview with Ai Weiwei comes the following:“My answer may sound like a cliché. I think you only live once. A life is like a fortune that is owned by every one of us. “Actually it’s not so … Continue reading

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Groys’ Irony

The previous post may have seemed a little obscure to some, but I have recently found a text that illuminates Groys’ irony. A recent article on Malevich begins with the following: “…can the Russian avant-garde function as an inspiration and … Continue reading

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Asymmetry

I found this quilt by Sonia Delaunay in the Sydney Paths to Abstraction catalog. I’ve been looking at it for a while, and just realized why I like it, and what it means for abstraction. The parts are not all … Continue reading

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All at once

I have to thank Mr. Stella for testifying to the strength of my own work, although he didn’t realize he had done so. He says that printmaking has “…one legitimate claim to superiority over painting,…it [creates] the surfaces it articulates … Continue reading

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Death Artistically Considered

Lest my readers think I’m getting excessively serious, I would like to expand on something from a couple of posts back. Death, strictly speaking, doesn’t exist, meaning that it is an affair only relevant to the living—survivors, perpetrators, legatees etc. … Continue reading

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The Wall

I want to be clear that the inhuman does not mean geometry, which in fact is all too human. The concept is not idealist and has nothing to do with ideas of “purity,” such as pure abstraction or pure form, … Continue reading

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