Tag Archives: color

John Eisler

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Color and Mark

I used to think that Stella’s Exotic Birds were not his best works. I could appreciate them as a necessary breakthrough, but bad works nevertheless. I never liked the template approach, that the forms were ready-made and just decorated with … Continue reading

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Colour in Sculpture

Stella’s Town-Ho’s Story is made of cast and poured aluminum, steel, and some ready-made bits and pieces. It’s not all scrap, in fact mostly fabricated. However, the colour of the piece leans heavily on the untreated color of the different … Continue reading

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Old and New

Stella’s work always offers the same experience—each new series looks awful at first, and then time reveals its beauties. How much more revealing of quality is a good strong dislike than the bland suspension of judgment most appropriate today. I … Continue reading

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Variable Decline

Adorno’s ruminations on the difficulty of “new music” include the following, which supports my own earlier comments on Richter-style abstraction and music: “Tonal complexes [in Wagner]…are already conceived in such a way as not to be perceived with the same … Continue reading

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Colored Lines

One modernist tendency is to eliminate the distinction between color and drawing by reducing the work to colored lines. The idea has a beautiful simplicity and logic. It looks like the artist of this piece has assimilated the late unfinished … Continue reading

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Stella’s Color

Among other things, the Moby Dick series marks a real advance in color. Stella’s color always had a dash of the arbitrary, which was one of its most interesting features. Personally I give the Protractors, along with Richter’s Color Charts, … Continue reading

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Realization

Stella’s skill in conjuring a beautiful arrangement is clear when he uses few colors, as here: But it continues into the ultra complex pieces, as in this other version of the same work. The openwork lattice at the bottom right … Continue reading

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Literary Form

In his book on the Moby Dick series, Robert Wallace explains how Stella builds links between disparate works by repeating elements. What is most interesting is that this is also how the novel is structured; motifs appear at intervals, building … Continue reading

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Pink and Blue

I remember Shep and I lying on our backs on the floor of the Ca’ Rezzonico in Venice, staring up at a large Tiepolo ceiling in cotton candy pink and baby blue. That work, which was utterly strange to me … Continue reading

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