Tag Archives: collage

Space of Collage

A while back I mentioned Briony Fer’s book on abstraction and the special place she gives to collage at the origins of the practice. I picked it up again to refresh my memory and one of the points has to … Continue reading

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Crisis Moment

Krasner’s unique style is made of strongly drawn circles, arcs and ellipses. She has a kind of compulsion to go around with her arm. In her case it’s not a limitation and more than a habit—it’s an expressive language that … Continue reading

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Olga Rozanova

Been looking at great collages by Rozanova. They have that beautiful freshness of beginnings. For her, abstraction was an open future, so she had no idea how to value work like this. It was all an experiment. We can decide … Continue reading

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Collage at the Beginning

Years ago, in her book on abstraction, Briony Fer suggested that collage was at the origin of the practice. I didn’t know what importance to attach to that idea, but I liked it. Her examples were collages by the Russian … Continue reading

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Stories in Stories

Stella’s large sculpture, The Town-Ho’s Story, is, among other things, a collection of smaller pieces. I’ve mentioned this before, but as I suggested in the previous post, parts of the main body of the work could also be seen separately, … Continue reading

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A Different Frame

This collage is like #5 in the way that the frame within the frame is handled—it’s less of an image than the others, more abstract in a way. But also, unlike #s 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7, the arrangement … Continue reading

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Arrived

Of course all arrivals are temporary, but this collage looks done. Had a bit of doubt as to how the increase in size (4×3′) would throw off the scale relation between the watercolor patches and the larger flat areas of … Continue reading

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Getting Closer

My new, bigger collage has been through a few changes, and it’s getting better (compare with first state). Funny how until that happens it always seems like it never will. Anyway, tried painting on the grey frame but that threw … Continue reading

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Next Collage

Here is a new work underway. In a couple of weeks I hope to show how much these things change for the better as they go on. This one is a step up in size—48×36 inches, instead of 22×28, and … Continue reading

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Collage

I was posting images of my new collages about once a week or so, but recently been spending too many hours at the day job. This one went along pretty slowly, but it did move in the right direction: toward … Continue reading

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Work

Lately I’ve been making a series of collages, all roughly the same size—22×28″, sometimes a bit smaller or larger—and find it tough going. In abstract art the temptation is always to accept early results, and that question gets more complicated … Continue reading

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Putting Pieces Together

This is the kind of collage I like to see from Motherwell, though there aren’t many like it. Parts of it resemble Arp’s torn paper collages, discussed earlier on this blog. It doesn’t escape from the pattern of blocky figures … Continue reading

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Less Figure, Less Grid

Still worrying about Robert Motherwell. Why? For the same reason as any artist might come to mind—because of how bad he is, and how good, and because those qualities are more or less undecidable right now. He’s bothersome, and his … Continue reading

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Other Figures

I’ve been looking at (and reading) a catalogue of Motherwell’s early collages. It has to be said that Motherwell is one of the important reference points for abstraction today. This is hardly a common view, but as a practitioner I … Continue reading

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Figure

This collage by Robert Motherwell is exceptional, in my opinion. It has a kind of cleanness and freshness that puts it over the top professionally, though those are not necessary qualities in any modern art, certainly not in collage, which … Continue reading

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John Bunker

Some collages by the British artist John Bunker are very good. I can’t help but think of Stella, as usual, but this piece is pretty compelling, and stands any comparison.

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Had Gadya

Still on the topic of Stella’s prints, my new catalog documents three of the Had Gadya pieces from original collage to an interim state. In all of them the first version seems, to my eyes, to have a clearer structure, … Continue reading

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Painting Collage

Blog reader Naomi Schlinke sent me an example of her recent work. I love seeing the pins that hold the collage together, partly because it means the work isn’t settled, but also because it just looks good.

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Lauren Luloff

I was struck by a review of a young artist in the NYT. The work seemed at first glance to be in some debt to Stella, which is not a bad thing to be, but checking into her more closely … Continue reading

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Figure and Landscape

To return to a topic discussed earlier, I mentioned the pastels of Degas, in which he transformed a nude into a landscape—or vice versa. In any case what we have is a work, and we can take it or leave … Continue reading

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