Tag Archives: Boris Groys

Kojève

Recently read a great article by Boris Groys on Kojève. Never read Kojève myself but I know that he taught Hegel to the surrealists, and I learned a lot about that from a very good book about surrealist objects by … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Current Affairs, Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Another Russian Philosopher

I’m always grateful to Boris Groys, who has opened so many horizons with his wit and penetration. He has also brought attention to lesser known Russian thinkers, and there are a lot of them worth looking into. One that attracted … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Current Affairs | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Groys’ Irony

The previous post may have seemed a little obscure to some, but I have recently found a text that illuminates Groys’ irony. A recent article on Malevich begins with the following: “…can the Russian avant-garde function as an inspiration and … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs, Ethics of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Groys

I found an article/review on Boris Groys by Benjamin Kunkel in the London Review of Books. Overall it’s probably accurate, but I didn’t perfectly recognize Groys in some of the more summary descriptions: “Groys is…idealist in his belief that the … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

No Progress Made

I thought I’d better amplify something I said in the preceding post, about art as an agent of enlightenment—the latter meaning freedom from myth. When art definitively became a secular religion, just before the turn of the twentieth century, it … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Missed Critique

In the very important article “On the Curatorship,” from his book Art Power, Boris Groys discusses the iconoclastic power of criticism, and he says: “Contemporary iconoclasm, of course, can and should be aimed primarily not at religious icons but at … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Lack of Time

If time is so short, why does it feel so empty? Because time has to be shaped. What we call work. Content, or feeling in art, is a fugitive effect of the shape.

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Infinity of Images

Reading Groys can also be encouraging. In my case it confirms the avant-gardist qualifications of my work—surprising to me as much as anyone. One of the strongest pieces in his book Art Power is the opener, “The Logic of Equal … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Achievement in time

Reading Boris Groys can be both enlightening and painful, not least because what he says rings so true. For example, the following words are a good description of my work: “To be an artist has now ceased to be an … Continue reading

Posted in Conceptualism and Painting, Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Science and Aesthetics

From Walter Benjamin: The place occupied in Goethe’s writings by his scientific studies is the one which in lesser artists is commonly reserved for aesthetics. This aspect of Goethe’s work can be appreciated only when one realizes that, unlike almost … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Current Affairs, Principles of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Demons

Some readers might be confused by my references to demons, especially in the context of the quote from Boris Groys in an earlier post, which might leave the impression that they are personal. The demons I’m talking about are social. … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Wound

The critics I respect are the ones who hurt me the most, or let’s say that they stick their fingers in the wound that already exists, the one I received from the great artists of modernism. The notion that one … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, American Modernism, Conceptualism and Painting, Ethics of Abstraction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ethics of Art

Over the last few months this blog has been circling around some ideas in aesthetics that may help to newly define the value of abstraction. Concepts such as non-identity, the inhuman and organic formalism have been presented. I was just … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Current Affairs, Ethics of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Discourse in and out of art

Boris Groys, a critic whom I respect, has described how the discursive mode has emerged in current art practice. It’s not clear whether he advocates this approach, but he describes it well. However, even he errs in describing modernist painting, … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Ethics of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The market in meaning

If, as Boris Groys suggests, art has definitively become discourse, then the position I laid out in the previous post must seem pretty rearguard to some. Actually, it isn’t clear yet whether the transition from objects to discourses has been … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

No Aura

A critic should be judged by the quotient of pain he or she can inflict. Here again is Boris Groys: “For those who devote themselves to the production of art documentation rather than artworks, art is identical to life, because … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Principles of Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Discursive objects

Listening still to Boris Groys, whose ideas should by rights be central to this blog. He says: “We see artworks as incarnating art. The famous distinction between art and non-art is generally understood as a distinction between objects inhabited and … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Ethics of Abstraction, Latin American Abstraction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Backstory as documentation

The concept of backstory is an interesting one, but as the comments on some recent posts have shown, far more interesting to many people is the condition of art as a discursive practice. Perhaps one of the strongest exponents of … Continue reading

Posted in Abstraction and Society, Conceptualism and Painting, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment