Simon Hantaï

Hantaï‘s works have an evident beauty, but I never found them interesting enough to really study because they rely too much on the process. Too hands off, not enough intervention by the artist. The right balance of those two things is tricky. Clearly less of the artist is a good thing, but not none. The artist has to be present in order to be transformed by the work. Anyway, now I understand that Hantaï’s strength is variation, which I always admire. His wall-like installations look like a jungle, other works channel Matisse’s cut-outs, others have a homely shape, like a potato.

Simon Hantaï, Meun 1968 (left) Etude 1968 (right)

Simon Hantaï, Meun 1968 (left) Etude 1968 (right)

Hantaï with his homely forms

Hantaï with his homely forms

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