While Waiting

The topic of waiting is not to be confused with procrastination. From an art point of view the biggest problem is the need to be busy, because the true religion of the modern world, in every culture, is work. The religion of art and the religion of work are in some sense in opposition, and they should be kept that way—we have to resist the syncretic tendency that would make art one god in the temple of work, like the Hindu mandir with statues of every mythic name, including Buddha and Christ.

Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, Toronto

Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, Toronto

So what do you do while you wait? The question itself reveals the flaw—the need to do something. It probably all starts with language—the common assertion that time is “spent,” from which is derived the axiom that time is money. Or once upon a time money bought up language. In any case, this is another topic of my book, developed in the chapter on Gego. Time should just be left without our input. Empty time. But not empty, because the fabric of time is the unfolding process of whatever is coming to be. Emptiness should be our stance toward it.

Robert Linsley, Island Generation One 2013

Robert Linsley, Island Generation One 2013

This entry was posted in Abstraction and Society, Current Affairs, Ethics of Abstraction, Principles of Abstraction and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *