Mythological Images

Following on with Brigid Brophy’s thoughts about Tiepolo, I’m particularly struck by her implicit linking of eighteenth century rationalism with the “critical” sensibility of the present. In the last sentence of the quote in the earlier post she talks about painting succumbing to the “social age.” She suggests that renaissance mythology painting was a crucible for autonomous art, an idea I have been pondering for a long time. There might be good reasons for any abstractionist to look at Veronese and Tiepolo. This Veronese has an interesting resemblance, and emotional reversal, to the previous one that she cites. A thought provoking comparison to the male nudes by Rubens that I discussed earlier.

Paolo Veronese, Scorn, from the Allegory of Love ca. 1570

Paolo Veronese, Scorn, from the Allegory of Love ca. 1570

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