Therese Bolliger

A few years ago I saw the ink drawings of Therese Bolliger, and they have been an important reference for my own watercolors ever since. I found them very inspiring. The ink bleeds to the edge of an area of water, and dries there, making a line—a well known effect—but what intrigued me was the way that the contours of several overlapping patches could get confused with each other. If you follow the lines you can get caught in a series of

Therese Bolliger, Interior Schema 5 2009

Therese Bolliger, Interior Schema 5 2009

loops, and lose the distinction between the discrete areas. This may not be what Therese intended, but it works for me. On the strength of works like these  she is, in my opinion, one of the best artists in Toronto. Her more recent drawings are different but still great. The titles, Rhizomatic, indicate that they could continue to grow by addition of more segments, a kind of process that I for one respond to, but the most interesting technical feature is the narrow space between certain of the zones. Sometimes they become lost, and that sometimes is a beautiful moment of letting go. Again, an unremarkable and very familiar aspect of any water based drawing or painting method, handled in a creative but pretty unassuming and subtle way.

Therese Bolliger, Rhizomatic 7 2014

Therese Bolliger, Rhizomatic 7 2014

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